Wednesday, October 15, 2014

intotheordinary said: Muslim here! As Muslims, we’re supposed to act modestly and respectably in society; so when you wear a scarf and are ‘read’ as Muslim, just keep that in mind. Others will look to you as a rep of Islam, whether you like it or not, so be prepared for ..and act accordingly. I think the modesty in speech/actions/etc mentioned above is the key factor to keep in mind. As long as you’re mindful of the image you’re (inadvertently) creating of Islam and do it respectfully, I think it should be fine. :)

((Thank you for your input! <3))

Anonymous said: I'm a huge fan of yours and I wanted to ask you something that's been bothering me for a long time. I really fancy the style and modesty of the hijab, but I do not have a set religion. Would it be considered offensive if a non-Muslim were to wear it?

((I will first off say that I am not Muslim, what is offensive to Muslims in regards to religious garments is not up to me—it is up to Muslims and their feelings+opinions.

Headscarves or garments that cover the hair are not exclusive to Islam, many cultures and other religions like Christianity and Judaism have a headscarf or shawl that is part of their practice [and certain cultures do wear headcoverings or wraps fashioned in different ways]. The word hijab has become synonymous with the headscarf in Islam for the mainstream, however, hijab is an Islamic concept that many interpret to be not only about physical modesty, but about modesty and humility in your actions and in your thoughts. [Also please be aware that hijab is also up to individual’s interpretations as well, not everyone will agree on the extent or necessity of hijab] Hijab, in that case, entails a lot more than just a headscarf. [several of my friends have expressed dismay at how this concept became about just a scarf :/]

I can’t tell you if it offensive, for that I suggest to you to refer to Muslims about how they feel about non-Muslims wearing a headscarf that can easily be coded as Islamic. Muslim followers, if you wish to, you can provide your input about this. Your voices are more valid than mine here))

Saturday, October 11, 2014

Anonymous said: i was telling my cousin how i wished more iranians valued traditional clothing like i see a lot of pakistani or indian people do (at least on special events or holidays, it doesn't even have to be every day) and that got me thinking about when iranians stopped caring about our native clothing. im sure in some places they still wear more traditional dress, but when and why did we stop placing value on those clothes as a people? do you know?

((I actually think many Iranians have an appreciation for their native clothes, but it is true that in most urban spaces like Tehran and Isfahan that traditional dress is looked upon as unusual. The Persian majority, for the most part in these urban spaces, dress in the usual garments—jeans, manteau, dress shirts, etc that can be found pretty much everywhere [tho the manteau is thought of as a boring, loose coat, Iranian fashion designers have created trends and styles for this garment].

However, all things considered, a traditional Persian garment, the chador, is still in use by many Persian women. If you look at towns like Abyaneh [near Isfahan], where the women wear their notable floral chador and dresses, and in Vazaneh [also near Isfahan], women have traditionally worn white chador [the reasoning scholars have given is 1. to battle the heat, 2. bc cotton is grown here, and 3. bc Zoroastrians once settled in this town], there are particularly “Persian” styles exist though it may not be obvious to some people. When some people try to think of “traditional” Iranian clothing, it can be narrowed to certain eras—the most popular being Safavid or Qajar. Due to the fact that Iran is an enormously diverse area, ethnic and regional clothing are also diverse. 

In contemporary Iran, other ethnic groups and Persians in certain provinces still do wear their native dress. The older Arabs in Khuzestan will still wear thobes/abaya ra’as/chador-e arab [I hear most younger Arabs in Khuzestan are more in sartorial line with their Persian counterparts], the Bandaris further south have their own traditional clothing too—for women there’s the leather/woven burqas and chador-like shawls.There are Kurds in various places, like Sanandaj, will wear their traditional clothing [kurdish clothing is also very diverse in itself!] out as everyday wear. There are also nomadic and pastoral groups in Iran that routinely wear their traditional clothing, like the Bakhtiari, Shahsavan, Qashqai etc. In the North, Gilakis+Gilanis will wear their traditional clothing too [those long colorfully stripped skirts! <3]. I’m not so sure when it comes to Azeris, I’ve heard that mostly traditional Azeri clothing is worn for special occasions, rather than every day wear like some other ethnic groups in Iran [if any Azeris have info on that, please do let me know if you wish!]. Anyways, my point is, there are many Iranians in Iran that appreciate their traditional clothing! It’s just that in bigger cities, it is viewed as really unusual :’/ I’ve had a friend from Dezful who wasn’t treated very well wearing his traditional clothes in Tehran…

We do have to take into consideration though the events of the Pahlavi era. Reza Shah Pahlavi, the first Pahlavi Shah, outlawed the wearing of traditional/ethnic and religious clothing by Iranian citizens in order to impose Western fashions on the population in the 1930’s for the purpose of creating the image of a “civilized”, Westernized Iran. Those who did not comply were subsequently harassed and women who could not bear to be without chador/hijab were said to have never left their homes. This combined with Reza Shah Pahlavi’s Persian-centric and fascist nationalism suppressed much expression of ethnic identity in Iran, even into Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi’s [who was put in his father’s places after the Allied Forces invaded Iran in WW2] reign when he had relaxed such laws on religious and ethnic expressions. When looking upon that recent history, it’s interesting to see how sartorial expressions of ethnic identity became strangled and have reemerged to the present day. I condensed some of this info bc this post is already too long but its the gist of what I think.))

image

image

!! Khooooooob, look how many people love me! I feel truly blessed for all these followers.

Hm, I wonder how many messages I have—

image

image

*cough* Well, ah, this could take awhile….

((sorry I’ve been so slow y’all. I’ll be sure to update as soon as possible! As you can see, there’s a lot for Iran to go through LOL))

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Anonymous said: are you planning on making an georgia, azerbaijan, or armenia? i would love to see all three but especially georgia and armenia as i perhaps recall an azerbaijan from your blog before

((I actually don’t have a design for any of the Caucasus yet :( I’ve been in the middle of doing an Armenia design bc it’s a popular demand from my followers, but I don’t know enough about Georgia to make up a design for them :””( Azerbaijan will maybe be coming soon bc Iran and Azerbaijan have history together but ah who knows. I’ve been working on a lot of stuff lately ;_; 

also sorry for disappearing for a bit, my internet went down but!! now its back and updates will come soon))

Sunday, September 28, 2014

cuscatlanaziz:

Jahangir’s Dream (Alternatively, Jahangir Embracing Shah Abbas) is a painting by Abu’l Hasan, commissioned to him by Mughal Emperor Jahangir in the 17th century. According to to Stuart Cary Welch’s commentary:

"Fretful over the possible loss to the Safavis of the strategic fortress of Qandahar, Jahangir had a dream of Shah ‘Abbas Safavi appearing in a well of light and making him happy. According to the inscriptions on this miniature, he commissioned Abu’l Hasan to paint it.

Qandahar guarded the Mughals’ vulnerable northwestern frontier and had been contested by Safavis and Mughals ever since Humayun had failed to return it to Shah Tahmasp….In 1613, Jahangir sent Khan ‘Alam as ambassador to Shah ‘Abbas to plead the Mughal case. His mission failed. The Persians took Qandahar in 1622 while Jahangir was too preoccupied with Shah Jahan’s rebellion to stop them.

Abu’l Hasan’s portrait, according to an inscription, was based upon inquiries—no doubt assisted by portraits from life by Bishndas, who accompanied the embassy. Eager to please his worried patron, Abu’l Hasan painted a frail Shah ‘Abbas with fashionably hennaed hands, cowering in the embrace of mighty Jahangir…The Mughal strides on a powerful but peaceful lion that has nudged the Shah’s miserable sheep into the Mediterranean. Nevertheless, the Iranian has the good fortune to share Nur ud-Din (“Light of Religion”) Jahangir’s refulgent halo, the massed light of sun and moon, supported by European-inspired angels.”

You can imagine Safavid Iran’s reaction to Mughal India after seeing that painting, Iran’s always been the dominant type after all. :’) Their skirmishes manifested in the strangest ways….. 

click for full view!

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Anonymous said: Oh I'm really sorry about safavid I know ottoman and safavid wars this era really colorful shah ismail and sultan selim really has a strong empires i though safavid a turkic bec my azeri friend tell me You must make more Comic about this so people like me to inform about history

((Don’t be sorry! It’s ok, I promise haha. You and your friend aren’t wrong about the Safavids being Turkic—but they were of “Iranian” Azeri origins to put it into contemporary terms! But they incorporated Persian into the court later in Safavid rule—the language of the Safavid Iranian court during Shah Ismail’s rule was actually Azeri, not Persian!

But don’t worry I’ll make more comics soon and I hope I can help you learn more!! ^q^/))

cuscatlanaziz:

Jahangir’s Dream (Alternatively, Jahangir Embracing Shah Abbas) is a painting by Abu’l Hasan, commissioned to him by Mughal Emperor Jahangir in the 17th century. According to to Stuart Cary Welch’s commentary:

"Fretful over the possible loss to the Safavis of the strategic fortress of Qandahar, Jahangir had a dream of Shah ‘Abbas Safavi appearing in a well of light and making him happy. According to the inscriptions on this miniature, he commissioned Abu’l Hasan to paint it.

Qandahar guarded the Mughals’ vulnerable northwestern frontier and had been contested by Safavis and Mughals ever since Humayun had failed to return it to Shah Tahmasp….In 1613, Jahangir sent Khan ‘Alam as ambassador to Shah ‘Abbas to plead the Mughal case. His mission failed. The Persians took Qandahar in 1622 while Jahangir was too preoccupied with Shah Jahan’s rebellion to stop them.

Abu’l Hasan’s portrait, according to an inscription, was based upon inquiries—no doubt assisted by portraits from life by Bishndas, who accompanied the embassy. Eager to please his worried patron, Abu’l Hasan painted a frail Shah ‘Abbas with fashionably hennaed hands, cowering in the embrace of mighty Jahangir…The Mughal strides on a powerful but peaceful lion that has nudged the Shah’s miserable sheep into the Mediterranean. Nevertheless, the Iranian has the good fortune to share Nur ud-Din (“Light of Religion”) Jahangir’s refulgent halo, the massed light of sun and moon, supported by European-inspired angels.”

You can imagine Safavid Iran’s reaction to Mughal India after seeing that painting, Iran’s always been the dominant type after all. :’) Their skirmishes manifested in the strangest ways….. 

click for full view!

Anonymous said: I m sorry but safavid isn't a turkic country?

((“Safavid” isn’t a country, it was a dynasty from the 16th to 17th century that ruled over Iran and certain other territories. The Safavid dynasty’s origins were from a Turkic [Azeri] speaking people, firstly from Shah Ismail who was born in Ardebil [in Iran] and his Qizilbash, but they did ‘Persianize’ in certain respects [having Persian be the court language] further into Safavid rule over Iran. The Safavid dynasty’s capitals were always within Iran’s (modern) borders: Tabriz, Qazvin, and Isfahan. It’s mostly accepted that the Safavid Dynasty was a wholly “Iranian” dynasty and era in Iranian history.)) 

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

((alright yall get ready this is VINTAGE ART from the admin here. I drew the first pic in like 2009 and it is the weirdest thing looking at it—it’s actually the first time I designed Iran when I was active in hetalia fandom on LJ haha. 

I guess not much has changed in terms of her initial design, I just defined her facial structure and removed that rose from her headscarf [she originally was to always have a rose hijab pin, but I scrapped it shortly after]

I did a side-by-side pic to kinda show where she started and where she is now. Yeah, I guess the refinements in design are subtle LOL. Admittedly, I’m proud of myself for improving artistically from where I was in 2009))